PositivityChange Post : Issue 52 : Stop Fearing Success!

We are halfway done with September! Time has gone quick! I can remember when we were just starting off the month with Labor Day. Now we are midway there and approaching October. Time sure does fly. One thing that doesn’t fly (at least here at the PositivityChange Post!) is fear of success. I know, I know, most people don’t tackle this fear. Most people are concerned about fear of failure; but, what if you’re afraid of success because you can’t quite envision what success might look for you?! Well, worry not more because this issue, I am breaking you of this bad habit!

Fear is all a part of the journey. I become afraid from time to time, but, that doesn’t stop my journey. I keep a composition notebook in my purse at all times jotting down whatever thoughts come to mind. Whenever, fears arise, I write down why I fear. It takes all of the power away from the emotion because now I am documenting why I am afraid. I realize that most times, I am fearful because I don’t know what the future would look like. When I was an economist in 2007, I had no idea that I would be doing what I am doing right now in 2017. I don’t even have to go back that far. You know what I mean. The fear of success is simply not knowing what the future holds and how you fit in that future. Getting to the root of fear of success is indispensable towards you getting ahead in life and your career.

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Have a positive and productive week!

7 Steps to Creating a Goal Tracker

 

There are seven days left this year. There is still plenty that you can do starting today! I am creating a 7-step goal tracker to help you optimize your time and maximize your output. Below are the December time management series articles:

Happy December, there’s still plenty to do:

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/happy-december-theres-still-plenty/

Three Things to Do with Three Weeks Left:

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/three-things-three-weeks-left/

Two Things to Do with Two Weeks Left:

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/two-things-two-weeks-left/

Ten Things to Do in Ten Days

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/ten-things-ten-days/

Time is your most precious commodity. It is essential to effectively track your time, resources and progress. Below are the seven steps towards to creating a goal tracker.

  1. Determine what are your definitions of success and progress

These two definitions are indispensable towards creating the goal tracker. Your success definition is what your outcome will be. Your success definition answers the question of what you want to accomplish. Your progress definition is your quality policy. When you measure progress at each milestone, has your product met the quality standard to go to the next phase? If that product does not meet the quality standard then progress has not been met. You cannot advance forward.

  1. Know your resources and people

You have to make sure that you have all of the people and resources needed to execute. If anything is missing, then you must create a contingency plan.

  1. Add milestones

The milestones are the beginning of creating the tracker. You need to start filling out the schedule.  The milestones are the points where you evaluate if the product or work in its current form has met the quality policy.

  1. Write down change management procedures.

A change management plan is necessary because the one thing that is certain is uncertainty. Usually, people create the goal tracker first. However, I think that accepting that change is always going to happen, creating the change management plan first is imperative. For instance, a change management plan tells you how to respond when a product does not meet the quality policy. Some of the things that this plan answers are how do we incorporate changes? When and where do we flag them? Who can approve changes? Creating the change management plan gives you a ready-made answer.

  1. Use 3-point estimation to create contingency plans.

I am introducing a project management concept. The three-point estimate takes the most optimistic (MO), most likely (ML) and most pessimistic (MP) and divide them. Here is the formula:

MO+ 4(ML)+ MP

6

This formula gives you the most likely goals tracker. Another reason why I introduce most optimistic and most pessimistic is because of change. What if you are advancing ahead of schedule, how do you respond to this? The most optimistic schedule will help you. Remember, that only thing that is certain is uncertainty.

  1. Monitor the progress.

Once you create your tracker and start working on your goal, you need to monitor progress and make adjustments accordingly. Consult the change management plan if necessary.

  1. Have a lessons learned section.

A lessons learned section details what has gone right and wrong during this time period. It is very important to assessment what has just happened because you can rely on it in the future. Don’t reinvent the wheel every time. A lessons learned section helps you with this.

Reference: http://www.pmi.org/passport/mar09/passport_mar09_seven-tips-on-how-to-build-a-solid-schedule.html

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Success Magazine’s Positive Quotes

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                We here at PositivityChange always like infusing positivity whenever it comes our way. While perusing the Internet, we have come across Success Magazine’s positive quotes article. Although Monday may spell miserable for some readers, fear not, these quotes will uplift you giving you your second wind of today. http://www.success.com/article/15-uplifting-quotes-for-positive-vibes

How to Rebound from Negativity

12162015 Rebound

I admit that not every day you are going to feel chipper and positive. Here at http://positivitychange.com/ we totally expect that and have a guide towards bouncing back from the doldrums and the pits.

Get out and breathe the fresh air

When you’re in the dumps, it can feel like the walls are caging in. Don’t stay in that helpless state. Go outside and breathe the fresh air. Just doing this simple activity, reinvigorates you because you are no longer confined to a particular space. Oftentimes, when we feel trapped, the energy is bad. Getting outside releases the energy.

Think of something that you have done right

You are NOT the screw-up that you think you are. We as humans can be very hard on ourselves. We tolerate our wins but falsely accept our failures. Snap out of this because you have done far more right than wrong. You can use this week for an example. Surely, something has gone right for you. Don’t internalize bad feelings.

Plan your happiness comeback

Okay so you are feeling down right now. That’s natural and even healthy that you are owning that feeling right now. The key phrase is right now. Don’t stay there. Plan your comeback. Write down things that make you happy and how you can plan baby steps towards getting back to happy. Use this plan whenever you feel yourself sliding back into helplessness and negativity.

Declare then Do!

12132015 Declare then Do

How do you do something different when you don’t know how to get started?

I know that when you see the title declare then do and you think it is the latest psychobabble. Well, it is not. I never serve psychobabble or popular psychology. My sole aim is to write about positive change leadership and management. I have been stuck before. This article is my lesson in how to get unstuck.

A colleague and I were selected for the headquarters’ leadership development program. Upon graduating, I returned to our agency and she served a detail at the headquarters. She detailed there for 3 months and then was offered a promotion at a different agency. I was frustrated because I was processing 70% of my section’s estimates making the same amount of money, whereas, she was promoted doing new and exciting work (for higher pay!). I asked her how she received her promotion. She went into detail telling me that she took a Management Analyst assignment instead of an Economist one while at the headquarters. That was seen as a high-profile assignment. Someone at her new agency inquired about her. That inquiry led to an interview which she aced receiving her promotion. Immediately I looked up the Management Analyst position and saw that project management was closely related. Although I had all of this information, I was stuck. I heard project management as a buzzword, but I knew absolutely nothing about this discipline.

How I Got Unstuck

Always start with the end in mind. You know what you want. Right now you just don’t know how to go about accomplishing what you want. Just writing down the end eliminates paralysis of analysis.

Work backwards from the end

Go step by step backwards all the way until you arrive at the beginning where you are. The middle tends to get murky. Use the end as a definitive point guiding you through the process.

Working in the public sector, there were job descriptions for everything. I researched the Management Analyst job description and saw that I needed 12 credit hours of management. Having an MBA qualified me for this position but I didn’t want to be minimally qualified. I surfed the Internet for cheap project management courses finding a great alternative. Then, I had my employer pay for it.

See which transferable skills can give you the competitive advantage

Don’t just meet the minimum exceed it! This is how you stand out from the rest. Remember, there probably already people who were doing your job. Your future employer doesn’t need a duplicate because that’s a waste of time and money. You must stand out and discovering where you can apply your transferable skills to your new ones.

In my case, I chose to obtain my CAPM (Certified Associate in Project Management) certification. I already had the transferable skill with my MBA so my CAPM would be my competitive advantage. I took my first project management course in April 2010 earning my CAPM certification in August 2011.

Now it wasn’t a straight and narrow path. I failed my exam the first time. I was stuck again! Immediately I performed an autopsy examining my study habits. I devoted 2 extra hours of study creating my own practice exams shoring up my weak areas. I passed the CAPM exactly 2 weeks later. There was good news: I received my promotion 8 months to the day I passed the CAPM certification exam.

I accomplished all of this because I declared to get unstuck persevering against all odds and you can too!

This Week in Positive Change Management : Manifest Success!

12132015 Manifest Success!

Full Definition of manifest

1:  readily perceived by the senses and especially by the sense of sight

2:  easily understood or recognized by the mind :  obvious

Full Definition of success

1obsolete :  outcomeresult

2a :  degree or measure of succeeding b :  favorable or desired outcome; also :  the attainment of wealth, favor, or eminence

3:  one that succeeds

 

This week’s in positive change management is to manifest success. Start where you are at right. Ask yourself: how can you make things better personally and professionally? Jot down 1 personal thing and 1 professional thing that you need to accomplish and do them. These two things must be so necessary to change that it is like the air you breathe. These personal and professional changes are mandatory. These are your non-negotiables for change.

Start envisioning yourself in your future space having achieved these two goals. Chart the pathway towards accomplishing personal and professional betterment. Why stay stagnant when you can move forward? What’s your definition of success? Envisioning yourself pursuing them.

You can manifest success. It is attainable. Even if you aren’t sick and tired of being sick and tired, you can always make tomorrow better than today. Here’s to manifesting success this week and beyond!

This Week in Positive Change Management : Delivering Project Success with 45 Days Remaining in the Year

11152015 Deliver results no matter what!

There is less than with 45 days left this year; and, of course, there are still projects outstanding. Some of these critical projects are behind schedule. With looming end-of-the-year deadlines, you have to reprioritize your projects and review your schedules. If there are contractual obligations where you have to meet a deadline then you must decide which time and schedule compression techniques you will use to avoid financial penalty. Two schedule compression choices are fast tracking and crashing. There are pros and cons with each. Below are their definitions and examples when to use them.

Fast tracking is a technique that performs tasks in parallel to finish them quicker and save money. There are pros and cons towards selecting this option. The pros are that fast tracking costs less money and the tasks are done together. The cons are that project risks increase and the duties must be overlapping in order to be done in parallel. If you can use the same resources and people to produce two or more of the company’s projects simultaneously then fast tracking would be the preferred option. Next is crashing.

Crashing is a technique that’s normally considered when fast tracking doesn’t accelerate the project fast enough. With crashing, the resources are added to the critical path to speed up the schedule. The pros are that crashing works well when activities are on the critical path and the cost associated with finishing quicker. Usually crashing is chosen only when there is a financial penalty of a milestone or deadline wouldn’t been met. For instance, if you must have this product delivered by November 30th else your company pays a penalty, then you’ll have no choice but to crash your project by placing all of your work on the critical.

Although crashing and fast tracking are to be used under extreme conditions, you can still manage these techniques by developing a milestone list. This milestone list is a way to keep track of your project’s progress. Whenever you resort to use these tactics, risks automatically increase. You’re already behind schedule. You don’t want it to become anymore of a disaster.

First, before creating a milestone list, let’s define what a milestone is. A milestone is any significant task in your project. A milestone list is a list of milestones that defines project milestones, oversees milestones progress and telling the status of the compressed schedule’s story. A milestone list will communicate project progress to the team during crunch time. This list will help you and your team in the remaining 45 days to track your project and deliver any and all good news. Good luck!