Want to Learn How to Better Manage Risks? Let Me Teach You How!

I get it. You are frustrated from working so hard on your projects yet things keep popping up out of the blue. You and your team hold endless meetings, planning, discussing progress, and then out of nowhere here comes a crisis. You’ve been blindsided more than you care to remember. You just want out of this madness but don’t know how.

It’s called risk identification. You need to better identify, manage and respond to risks whenever they happen. Want to learn how to better manage risks? Let me teach you how! This Thursday at 2pm EST, I am hosting a FREE Managing Risks for Project Managers webinar. I will give you all of the information you need to master risk planning, identification and responses. Because no one likes being caught off guard. Join me here: http://bit.ly/managingriskswebinar

Source: http://carlarjenkins.com/want-learn-better-manage-risks-let-teach/

This Week in PCM: Creating a Retrospective

06262016 Retrospective

Read the original PM.Expert article here: http://www.pm.expert/index.php/2016/06/26/week-pm-creating-retrospective/

As companies approach the end of a month or quarterly, it is high time to review their progress for the past time period to see what has worked and what hasn’t. A retrospective is a great way to accomplish this. A retrospective is part of the scrum framework. Scrum is a framework that does incremental improvement in product development. Within scrum, there are sprints which is a timed iteration where the team (scrum) works on a specific process. At the end of each sprint, there is a retrospective. A retrospective is ‘ a meeting at which the team discusses the just-concluded sprint and determines what could be changed that might make the next sprint more productive.’  Usually a retrospectives happen at least once a month because that’s the longest duration of a sprint.

Using the retrospective framework will help you identify what has and hasn’t worked and where you can improve for the next month or quarter. Below are the 5-step structure of a retrospective. They are:

  • Setting the stage
  • Gathering the data
  • Generating insights
  • Deciding what to do
  • Closing the retrospective

Setting the stage

The goal for this step is to set the tone and direction for the retrospective. This is the blueprint/roadmap section where you write out the retrospective’s destination and the metrics. What is your definition of success? What is your definition of failure? Where can you improve? These three metrics are essential guideposts that build your retrospective.

Gathering the data

Now that you have established your guideposts, the next step is to highlight important information and events. This stage is where you summarize the important metrics that fit into these three categories: what you’ve done right; what you’ve done wrong and where you can improve.

Generating insights

Here you use your summarized data to produce results. These can be trend analyses showing data performance. If there are any outliers, these should be reported and investigated. Sometimes outliers can be one-off events or the start of a new trend that should be monitored during the next month or quarter.

Deciding what to do

Once you obtain the results, deciding a course of action is next. Regarding what you are good at, how can you improve upon these results? These current results create your baseline or performance standard. You need to use this quarter’s current result as a springboard to better things. Conversely, you want to know what you are not good to be dropped. These underperforming activities are sunk costs. No matter how much effort and money you have put into them, they haven’t generated the desired return on investment (ROI) so the team drops them. Dropping them allows the team to use all of their energies and resources towards becoming better and improving upon other activities in the next category.

Return on investment is indispensable when deciding where to allocate resources towards areas of improvement. The team should create a monthly or quarterly forecast projecting the anticipated ROI for each area. The team should monitor their performances revisiting these areas during the next retrospective. During the next retrospective, the team can decide whether or not to add them to the what you are good at category or ditch it completely.

Closing the retrospective

Once a decision has been rendered, the team has the decisions and will use them as inputs into creating a better sprint. Closing is part of the continuous feedback loop. View closing as the output for the current sprint and the input for the future sprint.

Continuous improvement of teams, outputs and business processes is the ultimate goal of this 5-step retrospective structure. These five steps and their explanations will help you plan, execute, review and close your retrospective.

Source: https://www.red-gate.com/blog/building/five-steps-effective-sprint-retrospective

Like my content? Subscribe to PositivityChange here: https://carlarjenkins.leadpages.co/positivitychange-email-list/

Visit PositivityChange.com to manifest and manage positive change in your personal and professional lives.

 

Positive Change with Carla : Spring Cleaning Mobile Apps

Blogtalkradio

 

Visit http://carlarjenkins.com/ to read the original article here: http://bit.ly/22JmC7b

On this all-new Positive Change with Carla episode airing on a special time Friday, March 25, 2016, Carla will cover 12 mobile apps to help you with your spring cleaning. From organizing as a person, family, couple or even the children, Carla has a mobile app recommendation to help you spring clean, reduce clutter and increase positive change.

Here is the http://positivitychange.com/ article: http://positivitychange.com/2016/03/spring-cleaning-mobile-apps/

Click here to listen live:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/missphenomena/2016/03/25/spring-cleaning-mobile-apps

Visit Carla’s Blogtalkradio page to listen to the archives:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/missphenomena

Positive Change with Carla : Monitoring Progress

Blogtalkradio

Check out the original article at http://carlarjenkins.com/positive-change-with-carla-monitoring-progress/

We are at the halfway mark of the first-quarter and it is time to take stock. This Thursday’s all-new episode of Positive Change with Carla will focus on monitoring the progress we have made during these first 6 weeks. Here are the 5 steps towards monitoring progress:

  1. Create your plan
  2. Baseline your plan
  3. Enter project information
  4. Compare results
  5. Report results

Apply these five steps towards each personal and professional goal. If you are behind schedule on your personal and professional goals, this is now the time to adjust and still complete them by the end of the year. Here is the http://positivitychange.com/ article link: http://positivitychange.com/2016/02/this-week-in-positive-change-management-monitoring-progress/

Below is the Blogtalkradio show link to listen live tomorrow at 6pm EST:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/missphenomena/2016/02/18/monitoring-progress

You can listen to all past Positive Change with Carla episodes here at the show page link:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/missphenomena

 

 

Project Management Mondays Coming to Positive Change with Carla Radio

Blogtalkradio

 

I am happy to announce courtesy of http://carlarjenkins.com/ that I will debut the Project Management Mondays radio series on Positive Change with Carla. The debut show will air Monday, January 11, 2015 at 6pm. The inaugural episode will cover developing the project charter and my journey towards becoming a Project Management Professionally-certified manager. Check out my show link here: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/missphenomena/2016/01/11/developing-project-charter-and-my-journey-to-pmp

This Week in Positive Change Management : Delivering Project Success with 45 Days Remaining in the Year

11152015 Deliver results no matter what!

There is less than with 45 days left this year; and, of course, there are still projects outstanding. Some of these critical projects are behind schedule. With looming end-of-the-year deadlines, you have to reprioritize your projects and review your schedules. If there are contractual obligations where you have to meet a deadline then you must decide which time and schedule compression techniques you will use to avoid financial penalty. Two schedule compression choices are fast tracking and crashing. There are pros and cons with each. Below are their definitions and examples when to use them.

Fast tracking is a technique that performs tasks in parallel to finish them quicker and save money. There are pros and cons towards selecting this option. The pros are that fast tracking costs less money and the tasks are done together. The cons are that project risks increase and the duties must be overlapping in order to be done in parallel. If you can use the same resources and people to produce two or more of the company’s projects simultaneously then fast tracking would be the preferred option. Next is crashing.

Crashing is a technique that’s normally considered when fast tracking doesn’t accelerate the project fast enough. With crashing, the resources are added to the critical path to speed up the schedule. The pros are that crashing works well when activities are on the critical path and the cost associated with finishing quicker. Usually crashing is chosen only when there is a financial penalty of a milestone or deadline wouldn’t been met. For instance, if you must have this product delivered by November 30th else your company pays a penalty, then you’ll have no choice but to crash your project by placing all of your work on the critical.

Although crashing and fast tracking are to be used under extreme conditions, you can still manage these techniques by developing a milestone list. This milestone list is a way to keep track of your project’s progress. Whenever you resort to use these tactics, risks automatically increase. You’re already behind schedule. You don’t want it to become anymore of a disaster.

First, before creating a milestone list, let’s define what a milestone is. A milestone is any significant task in your project. A milestone list is a list of milestones that defines project milestones, oversees milestones progress and telling the status of the compressed schedule’s story. A milestone list will communicate project progress to the team during crunch time. This list will help you and your team in the remaining 45 days to track your project and deliver any and all good news. Good luck!

This Week in Positive Change Management : Meeting Deadlines for the Final 60 Days of the Year

11012015 Tame the 2-Month Timeline

November is here and there are only 60 more days remaining this year. Although there is still plenty to do, there isn’t as much time. Well, do not get overwhelmed by the looming year-end deadlines. Here are 4 steps towards finishing this year strong without being stressed out.

Prioritize what needs to be completed.

Some things are more important than others. These high-priority tasks require more time and effort. A technique used for these essential projects is called fast-tracking. Fast-tracking is where activities that were once done in order are now done together. Doing them simultaneously reduces the amount of time necessary to complete the entire project.

Break your projects down into smaller pieces.

The goal is not to get overwhelmed by the enormity of your objective. Breaking your tasks accomplish this. If it’s a big task that will take the whole 60 days, plan each piece by week. If it is a small task requiring a couple of weeks, plan each piece by day. Daily and weekly planning achieve two things: they doesn’t overwhelm you and they let you track your progress.

Monitor your plans.

It is essential to monitor everything that you do because hiccups will occur. When they do happen, you will be able to identify them then go to your contingency plan. Contingency plans are mandatory because even with 60 days out, things rarely go according to plan.

Reward yourself at the end of each completed phase.

Stopping to catch your breathe is very important during this time. You don’t want to get so ingrained in your plan that you don’t acknowledge your progress. Each completed phase puts you one step closer towards completing your small and big tasks in 60 days.

Hopefully these 4 steps will help you organize your work for the next 60 days so that you can save time, money and, most importantly, sanity.

This Week in Positive Change Management: Handling High-Visibility Projects as a Newbie

Follow these four tips towards handling high-visibility projects as a newbie.

  1. Be thankful that someone had entrusted you with this opportunity.

This is a positive change event. Instead of being overwhelmed, be happy to view this as a chance to prove yourself in the marketplace and increase your professional credibility and visibility. Taking this more optimistic viewpoint enables you to devise an approach towards capitalized upon this new assignment.

 

  1. Conduct project and personnel research

First review the project materials. You have to know what you are undertaking. Possessing familiarity with it lets you excel. Next, research the people. You can view their bios on the company Intranet or their LinkedIn profiles. It is essential to know your future colleagues’ personalities and previous work histories so that you can effectively create a staffing management plan to effectively execute the project.

 

  1. Create your own personal project schedule

Creating your own personal project schedule helps you envision it. You can also incorporate a what-if analysis covering any and every possibility because projects never go according to plan. These ready-made answers are necessary because management wants a definitive response regardless of how the people act and the project is going.

 

  1. Practice presenting your plan

Although you’ve never done it before, you are still the project leader and must exude confidence to your workers and management. Having these ready-made answers from your personal project schedule are necessary because management wants a definitive response regardless of how the people act and the project is going.

Visibility Photo 2

Highlighting Positive Risk Strategies

Here at www.positivitychange.com we focus on managing positive change. I’ve come across PM Study Circle’s Risk Response Strategies for Positive Risks or Opportunities’ (http://pmstudycircle.com/2015/05/risk-response-strategies-for-positive-risks-or-opportunities/) . This article lists four positive risk strategies. There are risks involved when trying to effectively manage positive change. I’ve decided to highlight each positive risk strategies in future blog posts.