5 Steps to Creating a Checklist

 

There are five days left this year. There is still plenty that you can do starting today! I am creating five steps to creating a checklist. This checklist will guide you through doing the necessary steps towards making sure that everything meets the acceptance criteria. Below are the 5-steps to creating a checklist.

  1. Brainstorm ideas

Write down general ideas around what you want to measure on the project. Now there is no right answer. Just get everything out of your head and onto paper.

  1. Write acceptance criteria

Acceptance criteria are the things that your work, service or product must meet in order for it to be approved and functional. These criteria is the foundation for the checklist. The checklist must comply with the acceptance criteria. The checklist is the measurement stick for all of the work.

  1. Accept ideas fitting the criteria

Now whittle it down into things that meet the acceptance criteria. These accepted ideas will become the work that the team does and measured against the checklist.

  1. List each step of the process.

The checklist must document each single approved step towards adequately measuring a stable process. A stable process is one which regardless of how many times you do this work, it will produce the same result. Stability is important to creating the checklist. List each step of the process on the checklist so that the team can check each item off once completed.

  1. Evaluate the progress after each checklist completion.

After completing the checklist, evaluate the process. Can you streamline some steps? Are there ways that you can improve the checklist process making it simpler and easier? Remember, the checklist is not a set in stone. It can be changed. I would recommend that you review your checklist because you need to make sure that it incorporates your best practices.

Reference: How to Make a To Do List http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-To-Do-List

Below are the December time management series articles:

Happy December, there’s still plenty to do:

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/happy-december-theres-still-plenty/

Three Things to Do with Three Weeks Left:

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/three-things-three-weeks-left/

Two Things to Do with Two Weeks Left:

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/two-things-two-weeks-left/

Ten Things to Do in Ten Days

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/ten-things-ten-days/

7 Steps to a Goal Tracker

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/7-steps-creating-goal-tracker/

Subscribe to PositivityChange.com mailing list to receive positive change in your inbox:

http://positivitychange.com/mailinglist

Like our Positivity Change Now Facebook Community:

https://www.facebook.com/positivitychangenow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Week in PCM : Retraining Your Algorithm

09152016-retraining-the-algorithm

Algorithm – a process or set of rules to be followed in calculations or other problem-solving operations, especially by a computer.

I have hired a virtual assistant to handle my social media accounts because I admit that this has become overwhelming. I have so many and even with HootSuite, scheduling my own social media has been cumbersome. However, now I am free. There are two benefits in handing over my social media accounts to a professional. One benefit is direct while the other is indirect. Freedom is the direct benefit. Knowledge is the indirect benefit.

Yesterday I had our first weekly follow-up meeting with my virtual assistant. She said that we had to retrain my Facebook business page’s algorithm because I was posting too much. She recommended only posting 2-3 times a day on my Facebook business page else the social media platform would think that I am spamming. Her using the phrase ‘retaining my algorithm’ has gotten me thinking about how to apply this thinking in my personal and professional lives.

‘Retraining the algorithm’ means taking positive action steps towards reshaping your personal and professional lives. Here are my four steps towards retraining your algorithm:

  • Admit what is not working and stop doing it
  • Write down what you want to accomplish with action steps
  • Take action
  • Measure the action

Admit what is not working and stop doing it

First and foremost, be honest. Admit what is not working and stop doing it! You are digging a deeper hole for yourself taxing your energy, emotions and spirit. Using myself as an example, my planning my own social media accounts has drained me. Once I hire the virtual assistant, I am free to pursue other business activities.

Write down what you want to accomplish with action steps

Write down what you want to accomplish. You cannot only hope and fantasize that what’s not working. Devising an action plan is a must because it creates a framework towards getting things done. Moreover, this action plan holds you accountable because you have crafted it yourself. You are taking ownership with an action plan.

Take action!

You must active instead of passive. There are so many people who write action plans yet take no action. Do not be one of them! You must implement your action plan. Remember, every day you take action you are putting the things that haven’t worked for you farther away in your rearview mirror.

Measure the action

Of course, you have to measure your progress. This trips a lot of people up. They have the action plan and are taking action; however, they don’t know how well they are doing or how to build upon the progress that they are currently making. This is where creating metrics come in. It is crucial that you know how well (or bad) you are doing. Measurements give me a tangible way to create a baseline and evaluate yourself. A baseline is essential because it’s a standard. Anything above the baseline is good and anything below it is bad. The baseline also lends towards continuous improvement because you can create additional metrics on becoming better.

These four steps will help you ‘retrain your algorithm’ for greater personal and professional success.

Like this content? Subscribe to PositivityChange.com mailing list: http://positivitychange.com/mailinglist

Visit PositivityChange.com to help you manage and manifest positive change in your personal and professional lives.

This Week in PCM : 5 Ways to Practice Mindfulness at Work

06182016 Be Mindful

Mindfulness seems to be the new buzzword today. Everyone discusses it but few people actually know what mindfulness really is. Here is a definition. Mindfulness is a ‘mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings thoughts and bodily sensations, used as a therapeutic technique.’ Awareness is the cornerstone of mindfulness. Are you aware of your surroundings? Are you aware of the attitude you bring the office? Here are my 5 ways to practice mindfulness at work.

  1. Take time to be conscious

 

Yes, work is a routine. Oftentimes, you may do the same thing, but, remember that there’s a difference between Monday versus Tuesday versus Wednesday et cetera. Take time to take in a new day. View this mindfulness activity as a restart button. Being conscious that this particular day is different from yesterday helps you get off on the right path.

 

  1. Be mindful of eating breakfast

 

Most people want to skip breakfast and go straight to work but doing this has dire mental and dietary health consequences. From a mindfulness perspective, skipping breakfast means bypassing a daily time to process your thoughts. Breakfast can serve as an opportunity to be mindful and reflect on how you’re feeling before work starts. This meal serves as a buffer providing with you a chance to be still before the workday gets started.

 

  1. Use mindfulness to respond versus react

 

Things happen in the workplace. People get sick on presentation day. You get placed on a project without any knowledge on how to contribute. Life happens. Instead of automatically reacting, take time to process what’s happening and your feelings about it. This mindfulness activity lets you remove the raw feelings and knee-jerk reactions. Furthermore, this gives you the chance to be mindful of the long-term consequences from a short-term reaction.

 

  1. Apply mindfulness during your breaks

 

This is a great opportunity to practice mindfulness. Breaks give you a chance to recalibrate your thinking which you’ll need throughout the day. You can take 15 minutes to shift your thinking and use unorthodox problem-solving approaches. Some of my best breakthroughs have come during my morning and afternoon breaks.

 

  1. Practice mindfulness at the end of the work day

 

Has the day ended the way you wanted? If not, use your evening commute to apply mindfulness. Rewind the day and see where you could have responded better. Look for areas of improvement. Do you need to pack a healthier lunch? Does your workbag need more organization? If so, use this commute time to reclaim the rest of your day. In addition, you can still apply mindfulness at dinner, with your family and before bed. This evening gives you with the chance to think about a more meaningful future; because tomorrow is the future.

 

Like this content? Subscribe to PositivityChange.com newsletter here:

https://carlarjenkins.leadpages.co/positivitychange-email-list/

Positive Change with Carla : Monitoring Progress

Blogtalkradio

Check out the original article at http://carlarjenkins.com/positive-change-with-carla-monitoring-progress/

We are at the halfway mark of the first-quarter and it is time to take stock. This Thursday’s all-new episode of Positive Change with Carla will focus on monitoring the progress we have made during these first 6 weeks. Here are the 5 steps towards monitoring progress:

  1. Create your plan
  2. Baseline your plan
  3. Enter project information
  4. Compare results
  5. Report results

Apply these five steps towards each personal and professional goal. If you are behind schedule on your personal and professional goals, this is now the time to adjust and still complete them by the end of the year. Here is the http://positivitychange.com/ article link: http://positivitychange.com/2016/02/this-week-in-positive-change-management-monitoring-progress/

Below is the Blogtalkradio show link to listen live tomorrow at 6pm EST:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/missphenomena/2016/02/18/monitoring-progress

You can listen to all past Positive Change with Carla episodes here at the show page link:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/missphenomena

 

 

This Week in Positive Change Management : Monitoring Progress

02152016 Monitoring Progress

We are a few weeks into the New Year and it is high time to review your current year’s progress.  Remember, we here at http://positivitychange.com/  want you to manage positive change effectively. The editorial board’s aim is to help the reader evaluate his current progress. Here are the 5 steps towards monitoring progress:

  1. Create your plan
  2. Baseline your plan
  3. Enter project information
  4. Compare results
  5. Report results

Apply these five steps towards each personal and professional goal. If you are behind schedule on your personal and professional goals, this is now the time to adjust and still complete them by the end of the year. There are over 320 days remaining.

Source: http://www.slideshare.net/kabani/how-to-monitor-your-project-progress

For this and other positive change management tips, visit http://positivitychange.com/

This Week in Positive Change Management : Meeting Deadlines for the Final 60 Days of the Year

11012015 Tame the 2-Month Timeline

November is here and there are only 60 more days remaining this year. Although there is still plenty to do, there isn’t as much time. Well, do not get overwhelmed by the looming year-end deadlines. Here are 4 steps towards finishing this year strong without being stressed out.

Prioritize what needs to be completed.

Some things are more important than others. These high-priority tasks require more time and effort. A technique used for these essential projects is called fast-tracking. Fast-tracking is where activities that were once done in order are now done together. Doing them simultaneously reduces the amount of time necessary to complete the entire project.

Break your projects down into smaller pieces.

The goal is not to get overwhelmed by the enormity of your objective. Breaking your tasks accomplish this. If it’s a big task that will take the whole 60 days, plan each piece by week. If it is a small task requiring a couple of weeks, plan each piece by day. Daily and weekly planning achieve two things: they doesn’t overwhelm you and they let you track your progress.

Monitor your plans.

It is essential to monitor everything that you do because hiccups will occur. When they do happen, you will be able to identify them then go to your contingency plan. Contingency plans are mandatory because even with 60 days out, things rarely go according to plan.

Reward yourself at the end of each completed phase.

Stopping to catch your breathe is very important during this time. You don’t want to get so ingrained in your plan that you don’t acknowledge your progress. Each completed phase puts you one step closer towards completing your small and big tasks in 60 days.

Hopefully these 4 steps will help you organize your work for the next 60 days so that you can save time, money and, most importantly, sanity.

This Week in Positive Change Management: How to Stop Paralysis of Analysis

Stop Paralysis Analysis

Paralysis of analysis happens to everyone. We think about things too much and all of a sudden they snowball overwhelming us. Your original thought which was derived from good intentions became unmanageable. We’ve all been there. Here are my 3 tips for breaking free from paralysis of analysis.

Break the big goal into many smaller parts.

Paralysis of analysis is usually due to thinking too much about everything. To combat this arresting of thought, you must go from the general to the specific. This requires using a filter to whittle down the number of ideas swirling around in your head. Instead of doing 5 things at once, do 1 thing 5 separate times. Once you centralize your focus on one specific part, the paralysis stops and you can restart again.

Pick one small part and start working on it.

Working on one small part lets you generate small wins. These small victories bolster your confidence and builds your momentum. Using the 5 parts as an example, if you complete 1 of the 5 parts that equals 20% progress. Each completion puts you closer towards your 100% goal.

Celebrate the small wins to sustain momentum.

Once you’re done, take time out to celebrate your win. Focus on the present and not the future. Rather than loathing that you aren’t at 100% yet, acknowledge that the 20% that you’ve completed has put you closer towards your goal.

Implementing these three tips propel you further along towards accomplishing your overall goal and demolishing paralysis of analysis.