This Week in PCM : Monitoring Your Plan

06022016 Monitoring Your Plan

When the original plan is not working, people automatically ditch it and go to Plan B. That would be premature because you do not have any measurements to evaluate performance. It is essential to know what is wrong with your original plan and how you can fix it before going onto plan B. You need to have some metrics that will let you know when your original plan is not working. This article will help you develop the metrics necessary to measure performance. Below is an example:

Example: You are in charge of an air conditioning system. The machine is supposed to stay at 65 degrees. If it registers 67 degrees or higher seven times, then pull it from operations and fix it. If after reinstalling the machine, it still malfunctions then you pull it and go with another air conditioning machine. This second machine is your plan B.

Here are my steps for monitoring your plan before going to Plan B:

What is your metric?

You cannot properly diagnosis a problem without knowing what specifically is wrong. Having a metric sets the baseline for monitoring performance.

What is the number or percentage that would force a review?

You have to have a threshold to measure against. For those who do not know, the definition of a threshold is ‘the point at which something begins or changes.’ Your threshold is the margin or spread where certain deviations are acceptable. When the plan operates outside of this threshold, then there is cause for concern.

What situation would happen for you to go with plan B?

In essence, what is the tipping point? What is the exact point where you ditch your monitoring plan and delve into plan B. Your tipping points are outside your threshold. List this point because you need to know when to transition. If you don’t list the tipping point’s criteria, then you won’t transition in time.

Hopefully these three things will guide you towards better decision-making in developing a monitoring plan and knowing when to move to Plan B.

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How to Rebound from Negativity

12162015 Rebound

I admit that not every day you are going to feel chipper and positive. Here at http://positivitychange.com/ we totally expect that and have a guide towards bouncing back from the doldrums and the pits.

Get out and breathe the fresh air

When you’re in the dumps, it can feel like the walls are caging in. Don’t stay in that helpless state. Go outside and breathe the fresh air. Just doing this simple activity, reinvigorates you because you are no longer confined to a particular space. Oftentimes, when we feel trapped, the energy is bad. Getting outside releases the energy.

Think of something that you have done right

You are NOT the screw-up that you think you are. We as humans can be very hard on ourselves. We tolerate our wins but falsely accept our failures. Snap out of this because you have done far more right than wrong. You can use this week for an example. Surely, something has gone right for you. Don’t internalize bad feelings.

Plan your happiness comeback

Okay so you are feeling down right now. That’s natural and even healthy that you are owning that feeling right now. The key phrase is right now. Don’t stay there. Plan your comeback. Write down things that make you happy and how you can plan baby steps towards getting back to happy. Use this plan whenever you feel yourself sliding back into helplessness and negativity.

This Week in Positive Change Management: Handling High-Visibility Projects as a Newbie

Follow these four tips towards handling high-visibility projects as a newbie.

  1. Be thankful that someone had entrusted you with this opportunity.

This is a positive change event. Instead of being overwhelmed, be happy to view this as a chance to prove yourself in the marketplace and increase your professional credibility and visibility. Taking this more optimistic viewpoint enables you to devise an approach towards capitalized upon this new assignment.

 

  1. Conduct project and personnel research

First review the project materials. You have to know what you are undertaking. Possessing familiarity with it lets you excel. Next, research the people. You can view their bios on the company Intranet or their LinkedIn profiles. It is essential to know your future colleagues’ personalities and previous work histories so that you can effectively create a staffing management plan to effectively execute the project.

 

  1. Create your own personal project schedule

Creating your own personal project schedule helps you envision it. You can also incorporate a what-if analysis covering any and every possibility because projects never go according to plan. These ready-made answers are necessary because management wants a definitive response regardless of how the people act and the project is going.

 

  1. Practice presenting your plan

Although you’ve never done it before, you are still the project leader and must exude confidence to your workers and management. Having these ready-made answers from your personal project schedule are necessary because management wants a definitive response regardless of how the people act and the project is going.

Visibility Photo 2

This Week in Positive Change Management: Managing Positive Change for the Remaining 1/3 of 2015

Today is September 1st, the ninth month of 2015. If you haven’t completed what you want to thus far, I have good news and bad news. First, the bad news: 2/3 of 2015 is gone. Now, the good news: 1/3 of 2015 is left and you can still accomplish your goals with four months remaining. You can divide your tasks into quarters. September is the 1st quarter. October is the 2nd quarter. November is the 3rd quarter. December 4th quarter. Prioritize your must have tasks by quarters. Next, fast-track and accelerate mandatory tasks during the 1st quarter (September) by doing more than one task at the same time. Fast-tracking would increase risks which is why you would develop a contingency plan to handle any potential bottlenecks. Monitor the fast-track items’ progress with biweekly reporting to determine if you need to reallocate your resources. Finally, create a monitoring schedule for October through December to complete the fast-track tasks before the end of this year. Following these steps will ensure that you can still complete your mandatory tasks in the final third of the year.