Change is Messy!

12292015 Change is Messy

Change is messy. It really is. A lot of people want change in their personal and professional lives but want it to be nice and neat. Well, that’s not how change works. It is like growth. You cannot grow without some pains. Change is inevitable. It happens whether we are ready or not. This year is no exception. Here are four examples of changes that I have occurred this year and what I’ve learned from them.

Writing for LinkedIn Pulse

I am the first to admit that fear has kept me from writing for LinkedIn Pulse. There are so many ‘experts’ out there that I am thinking that I am disqualified. The turning point comes when I start seeing very bad posts with people misspelling words and writing crazy stuff. That’s when I realize that my material cannot be any worse than the bulk of what’s out there; and, I am right! My posts have been welcomed in my community. Also I have pushed myself to write insightful and educational articles benefitting people instead of trying to hawk merchandise (I mean at least give me a free sample chapter of your book!).  What I have learned about becoming a writer is that LinkedIn Pulse is always a great place to share ideas. I have broken my own rule of only posting once a week because I have so much knowledge to share. I post whenever I have a new idea or topic I wish to share. This platform has also let me promote my radio show which I love because it enables me to pursue another avenue of communication.

My radio show

I have been wanting to do a radio show since September. I love communicating and sharing information with people. Although there have been some false starts and people who think that I shouldn’t do it, I now have my own show. I have decided to go through Blogtalkradio because I see so many others use this platform. Here I’m thinking that all I have to do is create a Blogtalkradio page, talk into my phone’s video recorder and upload it onto my page like Soundcloud.

Wrong! Blogtalkradio is live not prerecorded so even if I do have my prerecorded audio, I still have to sit there at the appointed time and be in the studio. Also I learn that the system doesn’t take .m4a files forcing me to broadcast live. I admit that I still prerecord myself to hear how I sound before going on air. Furthermore, the hardest part is the planning. Radio takes work. I need to devise an interesting topic. I select a blog article then jot down points.

Developing a coaching network

I can be an introvert and I admit that right now my five closest people are all coaches. I am very singular in that respect because I have always relied on my intuition. Whether something is working well or not, I always conduct these self-checks where I evaluate my situation using my intuition. If something is going right, I ask myself how do I continue it going? If it not going right then how do I change it? This year, I have reached out to coaches in areas where I want to grow. I have a career coach, brand coach and business coach. I have even reached out and started seeking financial advice because I have landed my second six-figure job. Coaching has helped me improve my professional network. I have received important feedback.

I will admit that there have been some very rough patches with coaching. I have had some programs and masterminds haven’t panned out. In particular, I have to shell out my own money to do my website when I am supposed to go through the preselected website designer. I later learn after coming out of my own pocket that the leader has stopped referring clients to the designer.

Attending Conferences

This year I have decided to attend conferences outside of DC to expand my professional networking beyond the District and Cleveland. I have attended the Power Networking Conference in Dallas, the Periscope Summit in New York and the TCE Conference in Norfolk. I have acquired a whole lot of personal and professional knowledge that will aid me in my future. For instance, I have developed a new travel regimen, improved my elevator pitch, burnished my LinkedIn profile, and developed my own personal website (this is my virtual business card). Attending these conferences have made me step up my game because I know that I am capable of much more. Getting outside of the District, lets me see how other professionals conduct businesses at the national and global levels. It is quite eye-opening when you get out of your own bubble and see how others operate. The Periscope Summit stands out because this is the first one. You are literally on the ground floor seeing everything unravel in front of you. It is very much like a start-up and the backdrop is New York City. Hey, if I can survive there, I can survive anywhere.

What I have learned is to always be ready and not to fall prey to sales pitches. You aren’t obligated to purchase anything from the vendors. It’s all about your fit and your future vision. Remember, it’s your money. You’ve paid to attend the conference not the vendors. Another thing that I have learned is to develop a better system in order to get to the next level.

Here are my four examples of how change can be messy; yet, in each situation I have managed to learn new things that will help me in the future.

 

 

Harvard Business Review : The Hard Side of Change Management

We at PositivityChange will be the first to admit that change is hard. Yes, we like different circumstances but we dislike how growth makes things uncomfortable. Here is an article from Harvard Business Review entitled The Hard Side of Change Management. It gives 4 points (Duration, Integrity, Commitment and Effort) to more effectively managing change. You can read more here: http://bit.ly/1OkeFf0

This Week in Positive Change Management: Handling High-Visibility Projects as a Newbie

Follow these four tips towards handling high-visibility projects as a newbie.

  1. Be thankful that someone had entrusted you with this opportunity.

This is a positive change event. Instead of being overwhelmed, be happy to view this as a chance to prove yourself in the marketplace and increase your professional credibility and visibility. Taking this more optimistic viewpoint enables you to devise an approach towards capitalized upon this new assignment.

 

  1. Conduct project and personnel research

First review the project materials. You have to know what you are undertaking. Possessing familiarity with it lets you excel. Next, research the people. You can view their bios on the company Intranet or their LinkedIn profiles. It is essential to know your future colleagues’ personalities and previous work histories so that you can effectively create a staffing management plan to effectively execute the project.

 

  1. Create your own personal project schedule

Creating your own personal project schedule helps you envision it. You can also incorporate a what-if analysis covering any and every possibility because projects never go according to plan. These ready-made answers are necessary because management wants a definitive response regardless of how the people act and the project is going.

 

  1. Practice presenting your plan

Although you’ve never done it before, you are still the project leader and must exude confidence to your workers and management. Having these ready-made answers from your personal project schedule are necessary because management wants a definitive response regardless of how the people act and the project is going.

Visibility Photo 2

Enhancing Positive Risk

Managing positive risk is indispensable towards increased personal and professional growth. There are four positive risk techniques: enhance, exploit, accept and share. Enhancing positive risk means distributing the risk among participants. For instance, if your team lands a huge contract, they will split the bonus money amongst themselves. Enhancing a positive risk is a win-win situation both individually and collectively. You can post the project accomplishment on your resume and LinkedIn as a team member while simultaneously highlighting your contributor. This is all the more reason to employ this technique.

09122015 Enhance pic