5 Steps to Creating a Checklist

 

There are five days left this year. There is still plenty that you can do starting today! I am creating five steps to creating a checklist. This checklist will guide you through doing the necessary steps towards making sure that everything meets the acceptance criteria. Below are the 5-steps to creating a checklist.

  1. Brainstorm ideas

Write down general ideas around what you want to measure on the project. Now there is no right answer. Just get everything out of your head and onto paper.

  1. Write acceptance criteria

Acceptance criteria are the things that your work, service or product must meet in order for it to be approved and functional. These criteria is the foundation for the checklist. The checklist must comply with the acceptance criteria. The checklist is the measurement stick for all of the work.

  1. Accept ideas fitting the criteria

Now whittle it down into things that meet the acceptance criteria. These accepted ideas will become the work that the team does and measured against the checklist.

  1. List each step of the process.

The checklist must document each single approved step towards adequately measuring a stable process. A stable process is one which regardless of how many times you do this work, it will produce the same result. Stability is important to creating the checklist. List each step of the process on the checklist so that the team can check each item off once completed.

  1. Evaluate the progress after each checklist completion.

After completing the checklist, evaluate the process. Can you streamline some steps? Are there ways that you can improve the checklist process making it simpler and easier? Remember, the checklist is not a set in stone. It can be changed. I would recommend that you review your checklist because you need to make sure that it incorporates your best practices.

Reference: How to Make a To Do List http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-To-Do-List

Below are the December time management series articles:

Happy December, there’s still plenty to do:

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/happy-december-theres-still-plenty/

Three Things to Do with Three Weeks Left:

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/three-things-three-weeks-left/

Two Things to Do with Two Weeks Left:

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/two-things-two-weeks-left/

Ten Things to Do in Ten Days

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/ten-things-ten-days/

7 Steps to a Goal Tracker

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/7-steps-creating-goal-tracker/

Subscribe to PositivityChange.com mailing list to receive positive change in your inbox:

http://positivitychange.com/mailinglist

Like our Positivity Change Now Facebook Community:

https://www.facebook.com/positivitychangenow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Positive Change Radio: Happy December There is still Plenty to Do

Blogtalkradio 3

Read the original article here:

http://carlarjenkins.com/positive-change-carla-happy-december-theres-still-plenty/

Today at 6PM EST/ 3pm PST, I will broadcast an all-new Positive Change Radio episode. The topic will be Happy December! There is still plenty left to do because there is. There are 31 more days left this year and you can still make a personal and professional impact. Even if all you do is devote this entire month towards getting your tax receipts and your performance review paperwork together, that’s more than enough good work.

Click here to listen:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/missphenomena/2016/12/01/happy-december-theres-still-plenty-to-do

Read the PositivityChange.com article:        

http://positivitychange.com/2016/12/happy-december-theres-still-plenty/

Like the PositivityChange.com Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/positivitychangenow/

Like the Carla R Jenkins Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/carlarjenkins/

 

This Week in Positive Change Management: How to Stop Paralysis of Analysis

Stop Paralysis Analysis

Paralysis of analysis happens to everyone. We think about things too much and all of a sudden they snowball overwhelming us. Your original thought which was derived from good intentions became unmanageable. We’ve all been there. Here are my 3 tips for breaking free from paralysis of analysis.

Break the big goal into many smaller parts.

Paralysis of analysis is usually due to thinking too much about everything. To combat this arresting of thought, you must go from the general to the specific. This requires using a filter to whittle down the number of ideas swirling around in your head. Instead of doing 5 things at once, do 1 thing 5 separate times. Once you centralize your focus on one specific part, the paralysis stops and you can restart again.

Pick one small part and start working on it.

Working on one small part lets you generate small wins. These small victories bolster your confidence and builds your momentum. Using the 5 parts as an example, if you complete 1 of the 5 parts that equals 20% progress. Each completion puts you closer towards your 100% goal.

Celebrate the small wins to sustain momentum.

Once you’re done, take time out to celebrate your win. Focus on the present and not the future. Rather than loathing that you aren’t at 100% yet, acknowledge that the 20% that you’ve completed has put you closer towards your goal.

Implementing these three tips propel you further along towards accomplishing your overall goal and demolishing paralysis of analysis.